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Internet Trends

Thank you to my uni friend Michelle who shared this slide, very informative about the current trends, in particular what I find so interesting, mobile devices and the rise of Andriod products.

As a future librarian it is interesting to see where services could lead, perhaps the development of apps that allow users to use the library catalogues, databases and reference services. I actually have installed in my smartphone OneDrive app which allows me as a card holder to borrow eBooks and read them on any device. This is useful when I can’t get to the library and I really want to read to relax and get away from it all!

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Posted by on 06/05/2014 in LIS125

 

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Topic 1.2: … and what is the World Wide Web?

Week 3

 1. What are the differences between the Web and the Internet? How are they similar?

As explained in the lecture, “the Internet is a system of hardware and the software which enables the connection of multiple computers” (Woods 2013) which allows information to pass through between networks. The Internet was “originally designed for electronic mail, file transfer using ftp (file transfer protocol), bulletin boards, and newsgroups” (Jamison 2001). The Web on the other hand, “makes use of this functionality, just as email, instant messaging and other applications do” (Woods 2013). The Web in turn is made up of pages that connect and display information written in Hypertext. The Internet and the Web are similar in that they both allow information and knowledge to be disseminated, and used primarily as social tools.

2. Relating to the question above, how would you characterise the relationship between the Web and the Internet? Are they completely reliant upon one another? Can either of them exist and operate independently?

The Internet supports the Web, as it has been described as the backbone, but because the Web is an application, another similar application can be developed and be used instead. So the Internet does not depend on the Web itself, rather an application that allows people to view the Hypertext documents that retrieve information. Without an application, such as a Web Browser, content on the Internet would not be able to be downloaded, so neither can function without the other.

Jamison, E. (2001). What is the Internet? Poptronics. 2(10): 23. Retrieved June 11, 2013 from http://web.ebscohost.com.dbgw.lis.curtin.edu.au/ehost/detail?sid=35b31663-dabc-4d40-9de4-40f3c09ad03e%40sessionmgr10&vid=1&hid=19&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=bth&AN=5153163.

Woods, S. (2013). Topic 1.2:… and What is the World Wide Web? [Lecture]. Retrieved from http://echo.ilecture.curtin.edu.au:8080/ess/echo/presentation/cbc1bc75-abda-42a4-b32d-cf95728882ea.

Thinking about the Web

The ‘intangible’ nature of much of the technology that we use when we access the Web has led to a wide variety of metaphors being used to describe our interactions there.

Indeed, even the suggestion that there is a ‘there’ – a place we go to – is essentially metaphoric.

  • Do you think of the Web as an “Information Superhighway” or do you think of yourself as “Surfing the Web” or is it a little of both depending on the task and the sites you are accessing?
  • How do you think these metaphors shape our understanding of the Web?

In this week’s lecture Woods (2013) describes the metaphor “Information Superhighway” as modern, where information is structured and rigid, and so is the way we look for this information, we follow a plan, or we have an idea of what we want to look for before we begin to search for information. For example when I am researching for an assignment, I already know what I am looking for; I just need to find it using a more formal search.

“Surfing the Web” however, is postmodern in that information is disseminated through different media, such as video, text, still images and music or sound clips. People can rely on different links to take them every which way, unplanned and fluidly. Access to information is less formal and dynamic. I liken this to when I visit my favourite website, StumbleUpon, where I input my interests (such as writing, animals, the Internet and photography to name but a few) then press the Stumble button and I am taken to a webpage that displays something that interests me but one I may never have come across on my own. Highly surprising and addictive!

Woods, S. (2013). Topic 1.2:… and What is the World Wide Web? [Lecture]. Retrieved from http://echo.ilecture.curtin.edu.au:8080/ess/echo/presentation/cbc1bc75-abda-42a4-b32d-cf95728882ea.

The Wayback Machine

Ahhh, the culture-cringe of the wayback machine – simultaneously reminding us of the permanence our presence on the web, and hosting 8,976 Grateful Dead live recordings.
In playing around with the archive,

  • How are the early web pages different from those you use today?
  • What has made these changes possible?

I had a look at Apple, Lego and Google, and I am quite astonished at the evolving of the sites’ design. I also had a look at ABC (Australian Broadcast Corporation) and that too has come along way and is now quite slick and modern. My children love the webpage for ABC 4 Kids and that page is much better looking now than it was in previous years. The new web pages all feature better quality photos and the design of the website is user-friendly. Here is the link:

http://web.archive.org/web/20000621235236/http://www.abc.net.au/

I believe the changes I have seen have been made possible by the designers, they have taken into account new technology, including digital photography that is so easily uploaded into various websites. These images can then be manipulated to make wonderful backdrops as well as great avatars.

Hypertext

In the first activity this week you get acquainted with HTML, the mark-up language that controls how the information on a webpage appears in the browser window.

I hope that activity worked for you, let me know if you have any problems or are confused!

One of the most important aspects of HTML is that it supports the creation of hypertext links (sometimes also associated with the term hypermedia, when the link involves non-textual material such as sound, images or video).

  • What is your reaction to the examples of hypertext novels?
  • Why do you think that this kind of writing hasn’t really taken off on the Web?
  • How do you normally use hypertext links on the Web, and do you find them more useful in that context?
  • Do you ever get lost in the Web?

I had a bit of difficulty with this part:

“Have a look now. Go to the menu of your browser and locate a menu item named ‘view page source’ or similar. You should see something like this:”

I couldn’t find ‘view page source’; I use Firefox. If anyone can point me in the right direction that would be great.

Like others here, I was not fond of the hypertext novels because the story line was diminished as I followed the links like a Alice in Wonderland following the White Rabbit. The idea is brilliant if perhaps the story arrived at a more meaningful point that actually came together in the end. I love books and I love reading. I love escaping to far away places, but if the story line is not smooth, then I get distracted and uninterested.

In Victory Garden reminded me of a “Choose Your Own Adventure” book where you as the reader picked what happens next by choosing which way you want the story to go. It worked a treat the first time, but after a little while, the story was sort of lost and I believe people who like to read prefer a linear manner in the story telling.

A great example of using hypertext is in the study notes, I find that as I read along, some very useful and interesting information is embedded and it always a great learning tool to take a moment to follow the links. Also when I post on my blog or on Facebook, I include useful or fun links for friends and family.

When I am not studying I love to get lost in the Web. As I mentioned in my other thread I love wasting time on StumbleUpon.com. It seriously addictive and I highly recommend it to everyone here. But be warned, it takes effort to stop, once you are in, it is hard to get out.

Here is the hypertext for the message above, from ‘Hypertext’:

<!–[if gte mso 9]><xml>

<w:WordDocument>

<w:View>Normal</w:View>

<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>

<w:PunctuationKerning/>

<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/>

<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>

<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>

<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>

<w:Compatibility>

<w:BreakWrappedTables/>

<w:SnapToGridInCell/>

<w:WrapTextWithPunct/>

<w:UseAsianBreakRules/>

<w:DontGrowAutofit/>

</w:Compatibility>

<w:BrowserLevel>MicrosoftInternetExplorer4</w:BrowserLevel>

</w:WordDocument>

</xml><![endif]–>

<p style=”margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;”><b>Hypertext</b></p>

<p style=”margin-bottom: 11.9pt;”>In the first activity this week

you get acquainted with HTML, the mark-up language that controls how the

information on a webpage appears in the browser window. </p>

<p style=”margin-bottom: 11.9pt;”>I hope that activity worked for

you, let me know if you have any problems or are confused!</p>

<p style=”margin-bottom: 11.9pt;”>One of the most important aspects

of HTML is that it supports the creation of hypertext links (sometimes also

associated with the term hypermedia, when the link involves non-textual

material such as sound, images or video).</p>

<p style=”margin: 5pt 0in 0.0001pt 0.5in; text-indent: -0.25in;” class=”western”><span style=”font-size: 10pt; font-family: Symbol;”><span>·<span style=”font: 7pt &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;”>&nbsp;</span></span></span>What is your reaction to the examples of

hypertext novels? </p>

<p style=”margin: 5pt 0in 0.0001pt 0.5in; text-indent: -0.25in;”><span style=”font-size: 10pt; font-family: Symbol;”><span>·<span style=”font: 7pt &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;”>&nbsp;</span></span></span>Why do you think that this kind of writing

hasn’t really taken off on the Web? </p>

<p style=”margin: 5pt 0in 0.0001pt 0.5in; text-indent: -0.25in;” class=”western”><span style=”font-size: 10pt; font-family: Symbol;”><span>·<span style=”font: 7pt &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;”>&nbsp;</span></span></span>How do you normally use hypertext links on the

Web, and do you find them more useful in that context? </p>

<p style=”margin: 5pt 0in 0.0001pt 0.5in; text-indent: -0.25in;” class=”western”><span style=”font-size: 10pt; font-family: Symbol;”><span>·<span style=”font: 7pt &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;”>&nbsp;</span></span></span>Do you ever get lost in the Web?</p>

<p style=”margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;”>I had a bit of

difficulty with this part:</p>

<p style=”margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;” class=”western”><i>“Have a look now. Go to the menu of your

browser and locate a menu item named ‘view page source’ or similar. You should

see something like this:”</i></p>

<p style=”margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;”>I couldn’t

find ‘view page source’; I use Firefox. If anyone can point me in the right

direction that would be great.</p>

<p style=”margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;”>Like others

here, I was not fond of the hypertext novels because the story line was

diminished as I followed the links like a Alice

in Wonderland following the White Rabbit. The idea is brilliant if perhaps the

story arrived at a more meaningful point that actually came together in the

end. I love books and I love reading. I love escaping to far away places, but

if the story line is not smooth, then I get distracted and uninterested. </p>

<p style=”margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;”>In Victory Garden reminded me of a “Choose Your Own

Adventure” book where you as the reader picked what happens next by choosing

which way you want the story to go. It worked a treat the first time, but after

a little while, the story was sort of lost and I believe people who like to

read prefer a linear manner in the story telling.</p>

<p style=”margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;”>A great

example of using hypertext is in the study notes, I find that as I read along,

some very useful and interesting information is embedded and it always a great

learning tool to take a moment to follow the links. Also when I post on my blog

or on Facebook, I include useful or fun links for friends and family.</p>

<p style=”margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;”>When I am not

studying I love to get lost in the Web. As I mentioned in my other thread I

love wasting time on StumbleUpon.com. It seriously addictive and I highly

recommend it to everyone here. But be warned, it takes effort to stop, once you

are in, it is hard to get out. </p><p style=”margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;” class=”western”></p><p style=”margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;”><a href=”http://www.eastgate.com/VG/VGStart.html&#8221; target=”_blank”>http://www.eastgate.com/VG/VGStart.html</a></p&gt;

<br /><br /><br /><br /><!–[if gte mso 9]><xml>

<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=”false” LatentStyleCount=”156″>

</w:LatentStyles>

</xml><![endif]–><!–[if !mso]>

<style>

st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) }

</style>

<![endif]–><!–[if gte mso 10]>

<style>

/* Style Definitions */

table.MsoNormalTable

{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;

mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;

mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;

mso-style-noshow:yes;

mso-style-parent:””;

mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;

mso-para-margin:0in;

mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;

mso-pagination:widow-orphan;

font-size:10.0pt;

font-family:”Times New Roman”;

mso-ansi-language:#0400;

mso-fareast-language:#0400;

mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

</style>

<![endif]–>

Reflection

Wow, I have learned a lot this week, there are so many acronyms swimming in my head, my only hope of remembering all of them is to read my own posts! It is all so interesting and I feel a lot more secure knowing how the Internet works and how files are sent and received. Truly Licklider, Taylor, Kleinrock, Baran, Tomlinson, Engelbart, Berners-Lee and Nelson, just to name a few geniuses, who without I could not write in this blog, study for this degree and generally have an escape from the real world. I am so grateful to these gentlemen.

I hope to keep on learning and then pass on this knowledge. It’s the right thing to do.

 
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Posted by on 06/11/2013 in WEB101

 

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Topic 1.1: What is the internet?

ODT: This week’s activity

This week we are doing some snooping to see who owns which domain names.

However, it can be a challenge to pick out the important information on domain ownership and the listed ‘Registrant’ can reflect the name of the company that manages the domain name registration. After you note the ‘Registrant’ also scroll down further and look to see if there is an ‘Organisation’ listed. This will show you who the actual owner/client is.

•    Were you surprised by who owned some of the domain names?

•    Did anyone have success finding a popular site not hosted in Australia or America?

•    Do you see any patterns in domain name ownership emerging?

What a great exercise! I know that someone owns the net, of course there are companies making money out of me, I just never really knew who. It is surprising to see that Google’s registrar is MarkMonitor Inc (as is for Gooogle, Yahoo.com and yaho, flickr and Facebook). MarkMonitor, according to their website is a brand protector that “combats the loss of revenue, reputation and customer trust that occur when someone else exploits [your] brand for their own gain” (2013). I imagine that it includes misspelled domain names to avoid confusion in case anyone typed their name incorrectly when searching for these websites.

Online Brand Protection. (2013). MarkMonitor. [Website]. Retrieved 6 June, 2013, from https://www.markmonitor.com/solutions/overview-BP.php.

I had a look at a major international company – Alfa Romeo, because I saw an ad for the car recently and sure enough, based in Italy. One thing that was interesting to note was that my proxy trace traveled 22 928 miles or 36 899 kilometers. Very cool.

visual trace4

It seems that generally big companies use brand name protectors to look after their best interests and as pattern, I see that MarkMonitor is used quite a lot. This webpage also illustrates how very strict websites have to be with regards to content, for example, these websites must be renewed to avoid fees.

http://hexillion.com/asp/samples/AutoWhois.vbs.asp

ODT: How have your experiences of the Internet changed?

We are all aware that the Internet is not a static entity – it has changed and evolved over time. Some of you may not remember a time ‘before’ the Internet, while others will be familiar with its early days, characterised by screeching connections that were impossibly slow…

What is your earliest memory of using the Internet? How does it compare with your online experiences now?

Let me see, my step-dad got our first family computer around 94, 95? 94 I think. It was an Apple Macintosh and it had a tiny little screen (9 inch) and the monitor was chunky. We had an external modem that beeped and burped as it connected us to the internet. It was an awesome time. It’s a far cry from my step-dad’s computer now, all sleek and white and fast. We did have to wait ages for the net to connect and like everyone else here no-one could use the phone while the modem was hooked up. We literally had to disconnect the cord and plug it back into the wall to make a call.

I remember that we didn’t even know how to actually look up web pages and how silly we felt upon discovering we needed a http://www.address.com. And where to put said address? Everything was so new and now that I look back, so entertaining. I think we used AltaVista as the main search engine, although memory doesn’t often serve me well.

Today, I own an Acer with Windows 7 (with a 17 inch screen). I cannot use Apples, I’m not fond of them. My internet is super fast on a good day and utterly and frustratingly slow on a bad day. I don’t know where I would be with out the net.

Here are a couple of sites that might be of interest…

http://royal.pingdom.com/2008/09/16/the-web-in-1996-1997/

http://www.earthlyissues.com/internet.htm

ODT: Getting technical

So team we get a bit more technical this week as we discuss what the Internet actually is and how it works. If you are not familiar with all the specifics and it feels like we are speaking another language, don’t panic. We don’t expect you to become IT experts, but it is important to develop an understanding of what is going on ‘behind the scenes’.

• Why do you think it is important to know how and why the Internet operates?

• Is it useful to think of it as ‘just a network’? Why/ why not?

Up until now I thought the net and the World Wide Web was the same thing. For me it is important to find out a little bit of history because it is both interesting and an integral part of my learning. It is also, as many have already pointed out, something we should become more familiar with as we spend more and more time online, supplying private information on banking sites or social networking sites. I need to understand what goes on behind the scenes to better equip myself against hackers and identity thieves.

At the moment it is useful for me to think of the net as a network because I am still trying to understand the ins and outs. I understand the internet is derived from the intergalactic computer network and it is more like a backbone than anything else.

Reflection

This week’s activity has really opened up new doors for me in terms of wanting to know more about what the internet is and is not. The lecture was very good, but like Dr Woods mentioned 40 years of evolution condensed in one hour is a lot to take in. It was certainly interesting to find out that domain names have insurance in the form of MarkMonitor to protect their brand names from misuse, even when this domain name is misspelled.

I enjoyed reminiscing about my family’s first computer and our first foray into cyberspace. I have included a picture of what our computer looked like and thank God everyday for the evolution of technology that allows us to have a larger monitor screen, otherwise I know I would have gone blind sooner rather than later.

I have been working on my web presence, today I commenced a new blog under the banner “I want to be librarian when I grow up”. I hope to add to my blogs on a more regular basis as I feel writing is both fun and an effective learning tool.apple-macintosh

 
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Posted by on 06/06/2013 in WEB101

 

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Discussions Week 1

Hello lovely net102 students,

Tell me a couple of things about how you use the internet in your everyday life. Do you email? Skype? Play MMORPGs? Tweet? Update? Bank? Shop? Then, have a ponder and see if you can come up with some reasons why we study everyday life. What do we gain? Why is it important?

I must say I rely quite heavily on the internet at home. Since taking time off to raise a family I haven’t had a lot of time to go out and be a normal person in that sense, so I use the internet to pay bills, shop, socialise and communicate with friends and family here in Oz as well as overseas. And obviously I use it to study. I have a learning blog as well. I also love my games and have tried a lot of different platforms and genres. When I have the time I enjoy playing hidden object games and Skyrim, which is sooooo addictive!

I think that studying the phenomenon that is the internet is about getting to know a new medium that transports us into a new way of life. Personally, being able to study now in the comfort of my own home and at my own pace is wonderful. I would not have been able to accomplish it otherwise. I believe conducting research about people like me might open new opportunities for internet based distance learning.

 
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Posted by on 02/27/2013 in NET102

 

Tags:

3.1 Inform me! news media

1.    Summarise the main points in the readings noting your agreement and disagreement with the ideas and opinions of the author/speaker.

Media, as in newspapers and television news have long held the key in swaying the general public to a particular point of view. And indeed in Christopher Harper’s article, he mentions that editors are like “gatekeepers [who] highlight particular stories, promote trends, sort the journalistic wheat from the chaff, and, some would argue, restrict the flow of information.” (Harper, 2003, 274). But now, with so many aspects of the world moving into cyberspace, it is of little wonder people chose to obtain the news online. This may be a new trend but Harper acknowledges that it may transform the way we acquire our news in the not too distant future.

For example, online newspapers allow me, as a reader to choose what news I want to read. And what information to look for in archives; I agree that I now have a wider range of media that can deliver the news, such as video and audio, that I didn’t previously possess. And if I have access to a computer and the internet, I have access to my own “printing press.” (Harper, 2003, 272). In this reading, Harper demonstrates through the use of surveys how online newspapers are becoming the norm in today’s society. The target audience, who pay for the newspapers are becoming older and it falls on the younger, more technically minded audience to use the internet as their source of information about what is going on in the world.

Michael Kolowich of http://www.newsedge,com is cited as saying people go online because:

  1. News consumers want filtering
  2. Finding, or the ability to search for, data is important
  3. Browsing
  4. Communing

Harper then expands on the role of gatekeepers with the two studies involving ‘Mr Gates’ in 1949 and 1966, where the editor in question chose particular stories with certain prejudices in mind as well as what he believed was a good story. “Researchers found a set of factors that often determine what news get into the media.” (Harper, 2003, 274).

Here are some factors which apply to digital journalism:

  1. Intensity of threshold value
  2. Unexpectedness
  3. Sociolcultural values
  4. Continuity
  5. Cultural proximity or relevance

On the other hand these factors do not apply to digital journalism:

  1. Time span
  2. Clarity or lack of ambiguity
  3. Consonance
  4. Composition

Christopher Harper uses the Chicago Tribune Internet Edition as a case study, to explain how technology is changing the face of journalism today. The online newspaper compliments the paper version, however it allows readers to have access to more in depth stories; other media such as video and audio, as well as forums and technology reports and games. The designer of the website is Leah Gentry and she describes the process to be “nonlinear strorytelling… [where] one has the ability to link one computer page location to another.” (Harper, 2003, 276). This allows readers to follow the story from different points of view.

While Darnell Little, a reporter for the Tribune, uses the characteristics of Wall Street Journal to write his articles, another reporter Stephen Henderson enjoys the hands on approach to writing, editing and finally publishing the story. Both ways which are essential to the web design of the newspaper. These two reporters fall under the category of “benevolent revolutionaries”, one of three groups Harper explains makes up journalists and the way they feel about new media. The other groups are “nervous traditionalists” who are not enthusiastic about new technology and the in betweeners, the “serene separatists”. (Harper, 2003, 278).

Another point, Harper makes is they way newspapers make money, traditionally, the paper version depends on the classifies, however, with very specific websites out now (such as carsales.com), this is slowly declining and these business have to find another means of revenue to keep going. Online newspapers have adverts that you can click on and can be redirected to that specific page in seconds. Harper concludes by stating that “the growing trend of young people’s using the internet for information may create a new readership for news on the web,” and I tend to agree. People today are living life in a rush and finding that the internet is a convenient source of news, whether they want to know what is happening in their backyard or statewide, or even worldwide.

Christopher Harper (2003). Journalism in a digital age. In H. Jenkins  & D. Thorburn (Eds), Democracy and New Media (pp. 271-280). Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

2.    Compare the form and content of the on-line news sites you visit with traditional newspapers.

While I enjoy sitting down with a cup of tea and a good book, I prefer to read about the news online. I find that looking through the websites listed above is great deal easier than leaving my home, strapping my children in the car and going to the shops or a newsagent to purchase a traditional newspaper. And I feel bad about the amount of paper being used to in the adverts inevitably found within the folds of the newspaper.

It’s not often I do read the news online, but when I do, it’s through ninemsn.com.au, because I have a hotmail account, and after reading my emails, I log out and am redirected to the ninemsn homepage, where the day’s news are published. It’s easy to read as I can see straight away photos or videos; the weather (I have it set to my city); polls; recipes, entertainment news and popular searchers. If something catches my eye, I will continue reading. If nothing looks interesting then I close the window and continue on to check my Facebook account, for example. I believe it’s the convenience factor, that sways me to online newspapers, everything is one click away. Also it has the ability to be specific to what I am looking for and by setting up my preferences, I can enjoy a more customised version than that of a regional newspaper.

What I find in common with traditional and online newspapers is the ability to offer feedback. Referring to Jenknis’s participatory culture, (Jenkins, 2006), I can leave a comment on a story that I feel particularly strongly about, such as Letters to the Editor, I guess that with online newspapers, the comments can be seen as soon as I post them up and people can reply to them if they wish.

 
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Posted by on 04/26/2011 in MED104

 

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